2024 Calendar: 12 fine art prints by maritime artist Robert Carter OAM. size 20 cm x 20 cm.

The 2024 desk-top calendar is now available. It features paintings of 12 of the last commercial sailing ships. These calendars make an ideal gift for the marine enthusiast as well as being a unique collectable item.
Each page is uncluttered, with space to enter notes, appointments etc. The image shows a typical page, entitled "Towards Iquique: the Barque Polly Woodside".
At year’s end the pages can be separated and framed as an elegant wall hangings.
They will make an ideal keepsake or a gift for the sailing ship enthusiast.
free shipping

$28.00

  • Available

2024 Calendar. 12 gorgeous watercolours of scenes around Balmain by Jan Larsen

Large format 30 cm x 42 cm on fine art paper in spiral wire binding with hook.

Each image brings delightful light and colour to brighten your office or home, and can be separated and framed to enjoy in future.

The calendar day and date format is large and clean leaving space to enter events. (see images above).

 

shipping $12 added at Checkout

$39.95

  • 0.49 kg
  • Available
  • Ships within 7 days1

Heavy frosted glass lampshade

This beautifu retro-style l item looks as if it could be Lalique (but isn't)

It is very thick and heavy, about 2 kg.

Diameter is just under 40 cm.

Some professional advice may be needed to mount it on an existing light fitting

$65.00

  • 2.2 kg
  • Fewer than three in stock
  • Ships within 7 days1

Heavy frosted glass lampshade with light fitting

It looks as if it could be Lalique (but isn't)

It is very thick and heavy, about 0.6  kg.

Diameter is 24 cm.

The fitting shown can be used with a normal Edison screw bulb . (Or the large white one if desired)

The cord  plug fits a domestic bayonet lamp socket.

$65.00

  • 2 kg
  • Fewer than three in stock
  • Ships within 7 days1

Help Restore Kanangra buy a 6 in 1 Pen Tool. (Fund raiser)

It's primarily  a fundraiser; all profits go directly to Kanangra's restoration fund.

However this is a very practical device:

Strongly constructed, containing  a smooth clean fine point pen, a spirit level, a 3 inch / 70 mm ruler, a phone/ipad touch tip, and reversible Philips and slotted jewellers screw driver.  Bears the inscription "Kanangra Ferry 1912. Sydney Heritage Fleet"

$15.00

  • 0.25 kg
  • Available
  • Ships within 7 days1

John Oxley Tote Bag

Hand made from tough calico,  "a heavy  plain-woven fabric made from unbleached, and often not fully processed, cotton"A very practical gift.

All proceeds go specifically  to helping complete the restoration of John Oxley

$15.00

  • 0.2 kg
  • Available
  • Ships within 7 days1

Original rivet from James Craig

These rare items are for sale as a fund raiser to help pay for the endless round of maintenance on the ship.

Tens of thousands were removed but very few of these souvenirs remain. . Every rivet in the ship and every hull plate was removed and replaced with new in this epic restoration . The restoration was carried out in its entirety by Sydney Heritage Fleet workshops.

Encased in polyurethane  resin block. 

$75.00

  • 0.25 kg
  • Available
  • Ships within 7 days1

James Craig Teddy Bear

 

40 cm tall

Dressed in blue sailor's uniform which can be removed for washing. Answers to the name 'Jimmy'. 

Available for postage  or for collection from Sydney Heritage Fleet Offices at Wharf 7.

Indicate how you would like to receive him here>

$45.00

  • 3 kg
  • Available

Fine Art prints by Robert Carter

 SHF members are offered a 40% discount on the price of all art prints by Robert.

to receive the discount, in Checkout enter the code words "Art Print" in the discount code box.


Art work by Robert Carter "Clan McLeod Hove To"

High quality print of wonderful beauty.  A synopsis by the artist follows

SHF buyers receive a 40% discount

on Chromajet Spectrum 225 gsm satin paper.   (size   20.5 x 27.9 (cm) 

 

A sailing ship master, with no engines to stop or reverse, had to rely on two basic procedures if he wanted to stop his vessel for a short period. 

 

Taking in sail would be avoided, as this was time consuming and some distance would be covered before all way was off the ship.

If the wind were not too strong he could ‘heave to’, a procedure in which the yards on one mast (usually the main) were hauled around and the sails ‘backed’, to oppose the forward thrust of the sails on the other masts. This could only be done if the wind was not too strong as there were not enough forestays to support the mast with the sails aback.

 

In heavy weather, the term ‘heaving to’, was still used when the intention was not to stop the ship but to reduce sail so that the ship would not be blown over. A few sails would remain set, or ‘goose-winged’ i.e. lower topsails; to provide some steerage way. In either case a lot of leeway was made. ‘Goose-winged’ was the term used to describe the practise of furling half of a square sail, usually the weather side.

 

In this painting I have chosen to portray a situation when ‘heaving to’ was necessary. I have been told numerous stories about such an encounter and there could be several reasons why these vessels should interrupt their voyage. Sailing ships often found themselves short of food, water or tobacco towards the end of a long voyage if they had encountered unfavourable winds. A passing steamship would be a welcome sight and would be signalled by a flag hoist, with a request for food. There was an unwritten law at sea that provisions that could be spared would be given.  The transfer of an injured seaman was  another possibility. 

$85.00

  • 0.5 kg
  • Available
  • Ships within 7 days1

Art work by Robert Carter "Tasman Crossing The barques James Craig and Louisa Craig"

High quality print of wonderful beauty.  A synopsis by the artist follows

SHF customers receive a 40% discount

Chromajet Spectrum 225 gsm satin paper.    size 20.5 x 27.9 (cm) 

 

Tasman Crossing   The barques James Craig and Louisa Craig

This painting portrays two vessels from the J.J.Craig fleet on the occasion of their crossing of the Tasman Sea together, in 1907. They had both loaded coal at Newcastle, New South Wales for Auckland and left almost at the same time. 

When this type of event occurred, it encouraged observers and the Press to call it a race, but it was far from the truth. Usually the vessels were ill-matched and became separated in their attempt to seek out favourable winds. 

With a heavy cargo like coal it was impossible to try to coax extra speed out of the ship by judicious sail trimming. It was all a matter of luck and being where a change in wind direction could be used to advantage.

The two vessels illustrated are the barques James Craig and Louisa Craig.  Louisa Craig has the painted ports that were a feature the Craig Company’s  ships.  James Craig Is shown still painted white which was a carry-over from when she was named Clan MacLeod owned by a Sir Roderick Cameron.  She was re-named James Craig in 1905 and received the ‘painted ports’ after two years.

On this occasion, after a smart passage of 9 days, James Craig arrived at Auckland a half a day ahead of Louisa Craig.

$85.00

  • 0.5 kg
  • Available
  • Ships within 7 days1

Art work by Robert Carter "James Craig in Darling Harbour""

High quality print of wonderful beauty.  A synopsis by the artist follows

SHF customers receive a 40% discount

Chromajet Spectrum 225 gsm satin paper.       size 20.5 x 27.9 (cm) 

 

 James Craig returns to her berth in Darling Harbour after a day cruise off Port Jackson. 

Restored from derelict condition to sailing survey by the Sydney Heritage Fleet, James Craig is a testimony to the hundreds of volunteers who have spent thousands of hours and over 40 years to give her a second life.  In addition there were corporate donors and other members who, over this period were instrumental in raising the mountain of money needed for the raw and finished materials in order to complete the task; from Diesel engines to the rivets that would hold her hull plates together.

To one side is another vessel from the Heritage Fleet, the steam tug Waratah. It too, was brought back to life by similar group of volunteers. 

Darling Harbour is an arm of Sydney Harbour west of the Harbour Bridge; I have taken a certain amount of licence with this painting, as it is unlikely that in this part of the Harbour that this amount of sail would be set. 

A visitor from the UK, who had made a trip in James Craig, commissioned me to paint the vessel with all sail set and with the Sydney Harbour Bridge and Opera House in the background in the background.

 

$85.00

  • 0.5 kg
  • Available
  • Ships within 7 days1

Art work by Robert Carter OAM "Reeling off the Knots""

High quality print of wonderful beauty.  A synopsis by the artist follows

SHF customers receive a 40% discount

Chromajet Spectrum 225 gsm satin paper.      size 20.5 x 27.9 (cm) 

 Reeling off the Knots     The barque Clan MacLeod

The barque Clan MacLeod is depicted running before a strong following wind and probably reaching her maximum hull speed during prolonged gusts. A close look will reveal that the figures on her poop are ‘Heaving the Log’ i.e. measuring the speed of the ship.

Before the introduction of the ‘Walkers Patent Log’ a ship’s speed was calculated by quite a simple process that had been in use for centuries and was still in use in some vessels during the early 20th Century.  It was carried out (weather permitting) on the poop each day at noon or at other times as decreed by the master; usually by two Apprentices and the Second Mate. 

The equipment used was quite simple. There was a reel of light line that had a series of knots tied in it at pre-calculated distances. At its end was a wood float (known as the Log) that was cast into the sea. It had to remain stationary in the water as the ship ran on. The line was attached to a peg inserted in a hole in the Log. When the procedure was completed a sharp tug on the line unshipped the peg. A secondary line spliced into the main line near the Log and was attached to the Log in a position that allowed it to be hauled back on board with minimum resistance through the water. 

There was also a fourteen second sand glass. An apprentice held the reel over his head and the Log was thrown over the stern and the knotted line allowed to run out. The Second Mate usually held the sand glass. When the first knot passed over the rail the Apprentice called out ‘turn’ and the sand glass was turned over. The knots were counted as the line ran out and when the fourteen seconds elapsed the second mate called out ‘stop’. The number of knots that passed over the rail represented the ship’s speed in nautical miles per hour.  The procedure was also called  ‘streaming the log’. 

The Walker Log was a mechanical analogue device permanently mounted on the taffrail to which a similar light line could be attached. It had a bronze spinner with helical vanes on the other end that caused the line to rotate. The revolutions were counted by the instrument and the speed and distance run were indicated on a dial. The line was braided, not layed otherwise it would unwind.

The term ‘Knots per Hour’ is often erroneously used by writers of sea stories. It is simply a Knot or nautical mile per hour.

 

$85.00

  • 0.5 kg
  • Available
  • Ships within 7 days1

Art work by Robert Carter OAM "James Craig - The Final Voyage"

High quality print of wonderful beauty.  A synopsis by the artist follows

SHF customers  receive a 40% discount

Chromajet Spectrum 225 gsm satin paper.       size 20.5 x 27.9 (cm) 

 

 

 FINAL VOYAGE       The barque James Craig

 

The year is 1920 and a newly rigged James Craig prepares to leave her anchorage in Johnson’s Bay for Newcastle to load a cargo of coal for Hobart. 

 

Riding high out of the water she only carries the ballast that is necessary to get her there. The crew is making final preparations for her departure. The tug has taken the tow rope and the mate peers over the rail to see how much anchor cable has still to come in. It was customary for some sail to be loosened but not sheeted home until the wind was fair when the tow would be dropped. This departure would be the last she would make from Port Jackson until her complete restoration by the Sydney Heritage fleet 80 years later. 

 

I wanted to record this happening which was described to me by Bob Hewitt a crew member on that voyage and had to decide on a background that would identify the location. I chose the Colonial Sugar Refining Company as it appeared in 1920. Apart from the Glebe Island Bridge the CSR complex was the next best landmark. I searched through my files on early Sydney without finding anything that would help me portray this scene. On contacting the Colonial Sugar Refining Company, I was informed that all archived records now resided in the Noel Butlin Library at the Australian National University. I was able to obtain some aerial photographs from which I assembled a ground level elevation which had many features that had changed little in 80 years.

 

James Craig had many colour changes during her life time as well as a name change. Built as Clan McLeod her hull had been black, followed by painted ports, white then painted ports when owned by  J.J Craig & Co. of Auckland. I had to make sure that I chose the correct one for this period. Her last colour scheme was the grey and black which I have chosen.

 

The tug in the foreground is a composite of features of tugs of the period as I was unable to determine the identity of the tug that took her to sea.

The name Janet is a whim that I employ in such cases. The letters are an acronym for Jonathan, Andrew, Noni, Timothy, my children and Elizabeth my wife.

 

 

$85.00

  • 0.5 kg
  • Available
  • Ships within 7 days1

Art work by Robert Carter OAM "The HeavingLine"

High quality print of wonderful beauty.  A synopsis by the artist follows

SHF customers receive a 40% discount

Chromajet Spectrum 225 gsm satin paper.      size 20.5 x 27.9 (cm) 

 

 The Heaving Line   The tug   Waratah

A ritual experienced by all those who went to sea in sailing ships was ‘taking a tow’. In this scene the sailing ship is about to enter port. It was accompanied by much activity by the watch and was always supervised by the Mate. Prior to taking the tow-line, sail would be reduced so that the speed of the sailing ship could match that of the tug. In this painting the upper sails - topgallants and royals, are furled and the courses are ‘up in their gear’, meaning that they are hauled up to the yards but not furled at this stage.

 

The topsails were always left until last as there might be a reason to abort the tow at the last moment. In this case the sailing ship must have the ability to get going again quickly. The breeze is setting in towards the land and the sailing ship skipper must judge the right moment to take in the remaining sail. It can be seen that the anchors are already overside, with the Mate observing that all is ready for them to be dropped when needed. 

 

‘The Heaving Line’ was a light line that was attached to the heavier tow- rope. One of the skills that an AB (able seaman) was required to possess was to be able to coil the ‘heaving line’ neatly so that it would not tangle when thrown to another vessel. It was weighted at one end. 

 

The tow- rope could be either wire or rope. It was provided by either the tug or the ship requiring a tow. The cost of the tow depended on whose line was used. Sailing ship masters preferred to use the Tug’s tow -rope as it gave them control over when the tow was dropped. Tug masters preferred the longer lasting wire. There was about 20 metres of Coir rope spliced on to the end. This rope was made from coconut fibre and was quite elastic. This absorbed the shock of the tow- line loosening and tightening as the tug went over waves.

 

 

 

$85.00

  • 0.5 kg
  • Available
  • Ships within 7 days1



A Gift Voucher can be used to give a friend or family member an unforgettable experience aboard one of the Fleet's special vessels under steam or sail

Gift Vouchers  allow your friend or relative to take part in Fleet cruises and events. Various prices, all out-of-the- ordinary experiences,

 

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